Saying goodbye in 2013: David Nalbandian

The 2013 season saw the end of the road for several prominent ATP players. The Grandstand bids its second farewell to David Nalbandian.

David Nalbandian brought just about everything to the table throughout his 13-year career on the ATP World Tour. There was controversy (the ongoing saga of Argentina’s Davis Cup team, kicking a linesman in the 2012 Queen’s Club final). There were seven wins over players ranked No. 2 at the time and three wins over players ranked No. 1 at the time (all three over Roger Federer). There were bromances (most notably with Rafael Nadal) and feuds (most notably with Juan Martin Del Potro). There was even a Grand Slam final (2002 Wimbledon).

A look back at Nalbandian’s career:

Career-high ranking: 3
ATP titles: 11
Masters titles (year-end championship included): 3
Grand Slam finals: 1

Biggest win: 2005 Masters Cup final – beat Roger Federer 6-7(4), 6-7(11), 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(3)

Nalbandian’s 7-6(2), 6-4, 1-6, 2-6, 6-2 win over Xavier Malisse in the 2002 Wimbledon semifinals was huge, but he was not exactly an underdog in the match and it certainly did not lead to much (he got blown out 6-1, 6-3, 6-2 by Lleyton Hewitt in the final). Heading into the 2005 year-end championship finale, Federer was an outrageous 81-3 with titles at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. He had also defeated Nalbandian in an opening round-robin match in Shanghai. The top-ranked Swiss appeared to be on his way to another victory when he took the first two sets in tiebreakers at the Argentine’s expense. Instead, Nalbandian battled back for a miraculous five-set triumph after four hours and 33 minutes of play. A wild fifth set saw Nalbandian lead 4-0 only to get broken three times before Federer served for the championship at 6-5. Nalbandian managed to break back and finally maintained momentum by dominating the tiebreaker. Fun fact: Nalbandian was ranked 12th at the start of the tournament and only got in as a replacement for an injured Andy Roddick.

Most heartbreaking loss: 2003 U.S. Open semifinals – lost to Andy Roddick 6-7(4), 3-6, 7-6(7), 6-1, 6-3

Ah, what could have been…. Even though he did not reach the final like he did at the All-England Club one year earlier, Nalbandian without question came closest to winning a Grand Slam title at the 2003 U.S. Open. Had he finished off Roddick, the Argentine would have faced Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final. Ferrero was ranked No. 3 in the world behind Andre Agassi (lost to Ferrero in the semifinals) and Federer (lost to Nalbandian in the fourth round) and the Spaniard was far more accomplished on clay than on hard courts. Nalbandian came within one point of beating Roddick, but he could not quite get the job done. Not only did the world No. 12 lead two sets to love, but he also pulled ahead 6-5 in the third-set tiebreaker. However, it was Roddick’s serve and the American threw down a 138 MPH ace to stay alive. Roddick stole the set four points later and the rest is history.

Last match: Miami Masters first round – lost to Jarkko Nieminen 2-6, 6-4, 6-3

Nobody could have predicted that this would be the last match of Nalbandian’s career; not even after it was over and certainly not while it was in progress. After all, Nalbandian ran off nine consecutive games following a 2-0 first-set deficit to lead by a seemingly-insurmountable 6-2, 3-0 margin. He even had a game point on serve for a 4-0 edge that would have almost definitely been too much for Nieminen to overcome. Showcasing body language that suggested he was completely out of the match both mentally and physically, Nieminen started hitting almost every groundstroke as hard as he could and going for winners with just about every stroke. Out of nowhere, the Finn suddenly began connecting with those shots. He broke for 1-3 in the second and from there he was off to the races, ultimately completing a hard-to-believe comeback in one hour and 49 minutes.

Comments, disagreements, and your own personal Nalbandian reflections are encouraged!

Comments

  1. Most memorable match for me was his match against Nadal at IW in 2009. Nalby was leading 6-3 5-2 and Rafa was 0-40 on his serve. Rafa held serve, took the 2nd set 7-6 and won the third set 6-0 to win the match. Rafa went on to win the title, beating Andy Murray in the final.

  2. vamosrafa says:

    Nalby was also a player i really feared ! his backhand is the only backhand in tennis which sent shivers down the spine of rafa.. rafa also admitted he was afraid of nalby’s backhand before theie IW match nadline mentioned above ! And yea, that match was awesome for rafans ! rafa fought off 5 match points to finally break the nalby-shackles

    but honestly, i also remember the absolute beating he gave to our rafa in 2007 madrid and paris back to back…. lol… though rafa was very underdeveloped on hardcourts back then, Nalby was playing out-of-this-world tennis…fed was also a victim !

  3. Vamos James!!!

    Long live the bald headband look!!!

    #First

  4. Glad I got to see him play at Queens last year. Got to the final there of course but the rest, as they say, is history. Kind of sums him up really.
    Big talent, loads of injuries, love of fast cars, an interesting and colourful character. Enjoys life better than tennis, I feel, so no doubt will have a great retirement.

  5. vamosrafa says:

    lol, yes he abused the entire top 3 ! His backhand was just…..*lost for words*….

    his choking abilities were also world class though..pity !

  6. vamosrafa says:

    the loss against baghdatis in the semi of Aus 2006 was also BAD. he could have had the chance to fight for the title against federer

    • Ricky Dimon says:

      well we all know how that would have turned out….

      but yes, he should have beat Baghdatis (i think he was also up 2 sets in that one)

  7. vamosrafa says:

    yup..he won the first two sets ! haha, but yes the outcome of the final would not have changed.. at least nalby could have added another finalist performance on his resume..

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